Orientalism and Empire in Russia: Kritika Historical Studies 3

Michael David-Fox, Peter Holquist, and Alexander Martin (eds.)
$34.95
978-0-89357-333-1
364
2006
Paperback

Articles originally published in the journal Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History. A portion of the editors' introduction states:

"With their broad range of thematic foci and theoretical approaches, the contributors to this volume have captured some of the richness and dynamism of a growing scholarly field. The demonstrate the possibilities opened up by the disintegration of the Soviet Union, which has encouraged historians to pay greater attention to the perspectives and source materials of the former imperial borderlands. At the same time, tension between older and newer visions o Russia's historical role in Eurasia-as oppressive hegemon or bringer of "enlightenment" or, depending on the angle of vision, both at the same time- has proved intellectually fruitful, as have discussions generated by Edward Said's and other models of imperial domination. We hope that this volume will help deepen our understanding of Russia's complex and historically fateful dialogue with Europe and Asia as well as with it s own former imperial periphery."

CONTENTS From the Editors: Russia's Orient, Russia's West The Orientalism Debate 1. Russian History and the Debate over Orientalism ADEEB KHALID 2. On Russian Orientalism A Response to Adeeb Khalid NATHANIEL KNIGHT 3. Does Russian OrientalismHave a Russian Soul? A Contribution to the Debate between Nathaniel Knight and Adeeb Khalid MARIA TODOROVA Orientology and the Study of Empire 4. Catherinian Chinoiserie DAVID SCHIMMELPENNICK VAN DER OYE 5. Russia's First "Orient" Characterizing the Crimea in 1787 SARA DICKINSON 6. European, National and (Anti-) Imperial The Formation of Academic Oriental Studies in Late Tsarist and Early Soviet Russia VERA TOLZ 7. Between Local and Inter-Imperial Russian Imperial History in Search of Scope and Paradigm ALEXEI MILLER Imperial Practices and Experiences 8. Religion and Russification Russian Language in the Catholic Churches of the "Northwest Provinces" after 1863 THEODORE R. WEEKS 9. Did the Government Seek to Russify Lithuanians and Poles in the Northwest Territory after the Uprising of 1863-64? DARIUS STALIUNAS 10. Russification and the Bureaucratic Mind in the Russian Empire's Northwest Region in the 1860s MIKHAIL DOLBILOV 11. The Ambiguities of Russification ANDREAS KAPPELER 12. Caught in the Crossfire? Russian Sectarians in the Caucasian Theater of War, 1853-56 and 1877-78 NICHOLAS B. BREYFOGLE 13. Liberation through Captivity Nikolai Shipov's Adventures in the Imperial Borderlands DANIEL BROWER AND SUSAN LAYTON 14. Bondage and Emancipation across Cultural Borderlands Some Reflections and Extensions JAMES F. BROOKS 15. The Dilemmas of Enlightenment in the Eastern borderlands The Theater and Library in Tbilisi AUSTIN JERSILD AND NELI MELKADZE 16. Kazakh Oath-Taking in Colonial Courtrooms Legal Culture and Russian Empire-Building VIRGINA MARTIN Along the Borderlands of the Empire (A Conclusion) DANIEL BROWER