Linguistics

Compiled and with an Introduction by Predrag Matejic and Hannah Thomas.

OUT OF PRINT
$104.95
978-0-89357-225-9 (for set)
xxix + 1196
1992

This unique achievement in the cataloging of medieval Slavic Cyrillic manuscripts provides 1,842 catalog records and over two hundred pages of unified indices representing medieval manuscript material brought together on microform in the Hilandar Research Library of The Ohio State University. The originals of the materials span twenty-one collections housed in various countries, most notably much of the Slavic manuscript material on Mount Athos. The catalog records are preceded by a detailed Introduction which provides a history of the Hilandar Research Library (HRL) and visions for its future, as well as specific details about the contents of the catalog records and the indices. While bringing together information from a large variety of existing finding aids, the records also often present new, as yet unpublished, information provided by scholars as they worked in the HRL, especially for the musical manuscripts or pertaining to scribal attribution. The compilers have made a concerted effort to meld the requirements of American librarianship (the use of AACR2, LCSH, etc.) with that of medieval Slavic scholarship as evidenced in existing catalogs and finding aids. By presenting the descriptions in a standardized cataloging format, it was possible to make the catalog records accessible in OCLC and in Ohio State's on-line catalog (LCS), a project funded primarily through Title II-C of the National Education Act. While the publication of the printed Catalog is especially indispensible for scholars and institutions which do not have on-line access to Ohio State's LCS system or to OCLC, this publication is an invaluable reference tool to what comprises some 80% of the medieval microform holdings of the HRL, unique in North America.

"...splendid catalog..." (F. J. Thomson)

"...heroic accomplishment..." (J. G. Plante)

"...valuable contribution to the study of the Slavic medieval manuscript heritage..." (Paleobulgarica XV)

$49.95
978-0-89357-327-0
xxv + 736
2007

The new edition of A Supplementary Russian-English Dictionary (ASRED 2) follows the same principles outlined in the first edition of 1992 and, likewise, contains important words and expressions not found in either of the two dictionaries most often used in the U.S. It is primarily designed as a companion and supplement to these, although it may also be used independently. In ASRED 2 the net has been cast much wider than in the first edition and the volume of lexical material has been increased substantially. It builds upon what already exists, filling an alarming gap between what has been recorded thus far, and what is possible to record. The adopted approach was that of a single volume of manageable size which concentrates exclusively on previously uncited material. Any scholarship should be characterized by completeness and balance. In ASRED 2 the two have a special significance. The notion of completeness in a dictionary of a living language is a contradiction in terms: a language is constantly evolving, and the process is only complete when it dies. Even a meticulously developed and rigorously executed selection process has a certain randomness about it. By its very nature it will yield results that are weighted. If ASRED 2 has any bias at all, it is towards those areas of linguistic usage that have received the greatest prominence over recent years. The various linguistic forces at work result in a certain unevenness when one examines a synchronic slice of the language: some categories of words are scarcely noticeable, others abound. Here one has in mind terms which are a consequence of recent extraordinary political events, terrorism on a global scale, drug trafficking, technological developments, concerns about the conservation of natural resources, the spread of AIDS, and many other areas which are re-fashioning the world and its languages. ASRED 2 pays particular attention to the spoken word. This is amply illustrated by many thousands of words and expressions which bear stylistic labels denoting more relaxed forms of speech: colloquial, vernacular, vulgar, taboo and slang. ASRED 2 is both derivative and non-derivative. It is derivative in the sense that it continues a tradition in bilingual lexicography which goes back many years. Successive Russian-English dictionaries owe a tremendous debt to their predecessors. The non-derivative nature of this book is at the same time its greatest strength. ASRED 2 offers the user something new and exciting through its presentation in a convincing form of previously undocumented material in a bilingual dictionary. ASRED 2 can be used profitably by students of Russian, translators, interpreters or indeed by anyone who works on Russian seriously.

 

About the author: Stephen Marder has been continuously involved with the Russian language since the age of 18 in a great variety of environments: blossoming into an abiding passion at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (University of London), through experience in the U.S. military, professional use as a translator in Mongolia, lecturer in Russian at Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand), or program administrator and translator at George Mason University (Fairfax, VA). Most recently, the author has been applying his language skills in the government sector. ASRED and ASRED2 were both written and published during the author’s otherwise active career while living in vastly different places around the globe.

$44.95
978-0-89357-274-7
631
1998

Contents

Part I: Literature

CAROL J. AVINS

Jewish Ritual and Soviet Context in Two Stories of Isaac Babel     11

ELLEN CHANCES

Reflections of Contemporary Russian Society, Culture, and Values in Iurii Mamin's Film, Window to Paris     21

EDITH W. CLOWES

Zakhoder vs. Disney: Two Cartoon Adaptations of A.A. Milne's Winnie the Pooh, or American Popular Culture in Post-Soviet Russia and the Question of Cultural Hegemony     32

JULIAN W. CONNOLLY

A New "Spirit of Negation": Danilov the Violist and the Image of the Devil in World Literature     41

ANDREW R. DURKIN

Henry James's Response to Pushkin: "Pikovaia dama" and "The Aspern Papers"     52

LYUMBOMIRA PARPULOVA GRIBBLE

Women Authors of the Orthodox Slavs (Ninth-Seventeenth Centuries)     62

ГРИГОРIЙ ГРАБОВИЧ Франко i Мiцкевич: метаморфоэи <<валленродиэму>>     78

JOANNA KOT:Distance Manipulation In Search of a New Russian Modernist Drama     98

THOMAS GAITON MARULLO Hoping against Hope: Bunin, Rolland, and the Franco-Émigré-Soviet "Dialogue"     107

ROBIN FEUER MILLER Dostoevskii and the Homeopathic Dose     118

KATHERINE TIERNAN O'CONNOR Anton Chekhov and D.H. Lawrence: The Art of Letters and the Discourse of Mortality     128

MARIA PAVLOVSZKY

The Artistic Function of Grammar in Prose Texts: The Modal Praticle было in the Prose of Goncharov and Dostoevskii     142

ФЕЛИКС РАСКОЛЬНИКОВ <<Борис Годунов>> в свете исторических воззрений Пушкина     157

THOMAS SEIFRID

The Structure of the Self: Ptebnia and Russian Philosophy of Language, 1860-1930     169

MAXIM D. SHRAYER

Nabokov and Bunin: The Comparative Poetics of Rivalry     182

GRETA N. SLOBIN

Modernism and Women's Prose in Russia and Poland     197

ALFRED THOMAS

From Courtier to Rebel: Ideological Ambivalence in Smil Flaška's The New Council     210

ADAM WEINER

Yeats and Blok in Life and Art     221

 

Part II: Linguistics and Poetics

HENNING ANDERSEN

The Common Slavic Vowel Shifts     239

JOHN F. BAILYN

Modern Syntactic Theory and the History of the Slavic Languages     250

CHRISTINA Y. BETHIN

The Bisyllabic Norm of Late Common Slavic Prosody     271

HENRYK BIRNBAUM

Na peryferii. Najwcześniejsze zaświadczenie dwóch dialektów późnopraslowiańskich     285

ALAN CIENKI

Slavic Roots for 'Straight' and 'Bent': Experiential Gestalts, Conceptual Metaphors, and Cultural Models as Factors in Semantic Change     298

ANDREW R. CORIN

On the Bifurcation of Slavic into Vocalic and Consonantal Languages     314

LAWRENCE E. FEINBERG

The Automorphism of Slavic Declension in Synchronic and Diachronic Perspective     326

GRACE E. FIELDER

Discourse Function of Past Tenses in Pre-Modern Balkan Slavic Prose     344 MICHAEL S. FLIER

The Jer Shift and Consequent Mechanisms of Sharping (Palatalization) in East Slavic     362

GEORGE FOWLER

Voice Relations in Russian and Polish Deverbal Nouns     377

VICTOR A FRIEDMAN

The Grammatical Expression of Presumption and Related Concepts in Balkan Slavic and Balkan Romance     392

FRANK Y. GLADNEY

On Immperfective Accent in Slavic     408

ROBERT D. GREENBERG Towards a New Interpretation of Serbian and Croatian Morphophonemic Patterns     421

LAURA A. JANDA

Linguistic Innovation from Defunct Morphology: Old Dual Endings in Polish and Russian     431

EMILY KLENIN

A Syntax for Poetry: Word Order in Fet     444

GILBERT C. RAPPAPORT

Clitics as Features: A Non-semiotic Approach     460

ROBERT A. ROTHSTEIN

The Metalinguistic Function as an Organizing Principle of the Yiddish Folklore Text     479

ALEXANDER M. SCHENKER

On the Inventory and Structure of Polish Subjectless Clauses     488

ALAN TIMBERLAKE

Linguistic Layering in the Lavrentian Chronicle (The Imprefect Consonantal Augment)     501

GARY H. TOOPS

The Scope of "Secondary" Imperfectivization in Bulgarian, Russian, and Upper Sorbian     515

CHARLES E. TOWNSEND

Comparative Analysis of Relational Adjectives in North Slavic     530

MASAKO UEDA

Hybrid Conditionals in Czech and Russian     540

C.H. VAN SCHOONEVELD

The Plurality Feature as a Lexical Semantic Feature of Four Russian Spatial Adjectives and as a Subclassifier of Parts of Speech in the Definite Article in Slavic     555

Part III: Plenary Reports

ХЕННИНГ АНДЕРСЕН Диалектная дифференццция общеславянского яэыка. Парадокс общих тенденццй развития с различными локальными результатами     565

DEAN S. WORTH

Deržavin's Inexact Rhymes: A Preliminary Survey. Part I: Consonants Rhyming with Zero     601

$34.95
978-0-89357-310-8
216
2003

Contents

CHRISTINA Y. BETHIN: Prosodic Effects in Czech Morphology     9

STEPHEN M. DICKEY AND JULIE HUTCHESON: Delimitative Verbs in Russian, Czech and Slavic     23

EVA ECKERT: Life of a Language in Emigration: Taking the National Revival a Step Further, from the Czech Lands to Texas     37

MASAKO U. FIDLER: A Pragmatic Feature of [Nonserious] and Power in Czech     51

MICHAEL S. FLIER: Innovation in the East Slavic Non-Past: The Case of Belarusian First-Person Plural idom     65

MARJAM FRIED: Dimensions of Syntactic Change: Evidence from the Long -nt- Participle in Old Czech Texts     79

VICTOR A. FRIEDMAN: 'One' as an Indefinite Marker in Balkan and Non-Balkan Slavic     93

FRANK Y. GLADNEY: Prefixes and Verbal Diathesis in Late Common Slavic     113

LENORE A. GRENOBLE: The Prosodic Organization of Russian Conversation     125

JULES F. LEVIN: The North Slavic-Lithuanian Contact Area: Mutual Influence and Resistance     139

GILBERT C. RAPPAPORT: The Grammatical Role of Animacy in a Formal Model of Slavic Morphologic     149

SAVELY SENDEROVICH: Methodological Reflections on the Problem of the Beginning of Historiography in Rus     167

GARY H. TOOPS: Pushkin in Sorbian: A Contrastive Look at Aspect Use in Literary Upper Sorbian and Russian     181

CYNTHIA M. VAKARELIYSKA: Multiple Language and Cultural Self-Identities of the German-Speaking Lutheran Minorities in 'Russian Poland' (Mazowsze and Suvalkija) in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.     195

Edited by Demetrius J. Koubourlis

OUT OF PRINT
$22.95
0-89357-017-6
viii + 270
1974

Contents

 

Demetrius J. Koubourlis

 Foreword     iii

Robert Abernathy

 An Often-Solved Problem Indo-European kt in Slavic     1

James Augerot

 Jat' and the Bulgarian Verb     24

Herbert Coats

 On the Alternation j/v in Russian     29

Frederick Columbus

 Phonological Rules in the Language of Sofronij Vracanskij     43

Richard C. DeArmond

 An Abstract Phonological Interpretation of Verb Stems in Ukrainian Formed with the Thematic Suffix /oh/     50

Michael S. Flier

 The v/j Alternation in Certain Russian Verbal Roots     66

Zbigniew Golab

 The Internal Conditioning and Relative Chronology of the Polish `Mazurzenie'     84 Phillip Klindt

 Vowel Length Alternations in Czech Inflectional Paradigms     102

Demetrius J. Koubourlis and Donald J. Nelson

 Phoneme Nonrandomness and the Mechanical Morpheme Segmentation of Russian     110

Jasna Kragalott

 On the Phonology of Turkish Loanwords in Serbocroatian     127

Lew Micklesen

 The Slavic Comparative     140

Kenneth E. Naylor

 Notes on Chakavian Prosody     152

Elizabeth Pribic

 Some Observations on the Phonological System of the Language of the Alaska Herald     167

Edward T. Purcell

 A Model for Word-tone and Segmental Duration in Serbocroatian     178

Michael Shapiro

 Phonological Aspects of the Russian Morphophonemic Component     203

George Y. Shevelov

 The Reflexes of *dj in Ukranian     223

Dean S. Worth

 On Irregularities (Real and Apparent)     235

Index     251

Pages